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Zero Trust Architecture

Simple Definition for Beginners: Zero Trust Architecture (ZTA) is a cybersecurity approach that assumes all users, devices, and network components are untrusted, requiring continuous authentication and verification for access, regardless of their location or network perimeter. Common Use Example: A company adopts Zero Trust Architecture, implementing strict access controls, continuous monitoring, and multi-factor authentication to protect sensitive data and prevent unauthorized access. Technical Definition for Professionals: Zero Trust Architecture (ZTA) is a security model and strategy that assumes no inherent trust in any user, device, or network component, whether inside or outside the traditional network perimeter. Key aspects of Zero Trust Architecture include: · Continuous Authentication: Users and devices are continuously authenticated and authorized based on their behavior, context, and risk factors. · Micro-Segmentation: Network segmentation is applied at a granular level to restrict access to resources and applications based on least privilege principles. · Policy Enforcement: Access policies are enforced dynamically based on real-time risk assessments, identity context, and device posture. · Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA): Strong authentication mechanisms, such as MFA, are used to verify user identities and device trustworthiness. · Encryption and Data Protection: Data is encrypted both in transit and at rest, with strict controls on data access and usage.

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